Just a little more . . . . .

How to make it go fast

Moderators: Greenleaf, KTA, BC847, Richie O

Re: Just a little more . . . . .

Postby BC847 » Sun Nov 03, 2019 6:22 pm

Yeah. One of the voice's OCD caught a discrepancy in that spelling tonight. The ATSG manual spells it "Bellville". The Goerend Trans folks spell it "Belleville". I'm not sure where I got Bellvue from.

So, I did a Google search:
According to Wikipedia, everybody's right:
A Belleville washer, also known as a coned-disc spring, conical spring washer, disc spring, Belleville spring or cupped spring washer, is a conical shell which can be loaded along its axis either statically or dynamically. A Belleville washer is a type of spring shaped like a washer.

(I'm gonna fix that).
David

1993 12mm VE Fueled W250 CC, Green
12.67 @ 103.35
Your basic farm truck ;)
BC847
Administrator
 
Posts: 2033
Joined: Wed Jan 03, 2007 5:22 pm

Re: Just a little more . . . . .

Postby BC847 » Sun Nov 03, 2019 7:54 pm

Anyhoo, messing with it a little this evening got the Rear (Forward) Clutch, including the input-shaft assembled.

So, start with a clean 48RE billet/alloy input shaft.

Image



Now, we want to install the rear clutch's apply-piston. I'm upgrading to one that's a little more ridged via more meat and reinforcing ribs. Further, where my OEM apply-piston is of the earlier design, it's 0.840" tall. This new apply-piston is of the late design in that it's 0.780" tall.

Image



After lubricating all appropriate surfaces, install the apply-piston with a twisting motion so as to lessen the chance of the seal's lip from inverting.

Image



Next, we'll install the belleville-spring and it's associated hardware.

Image



Hear again, I'm upgrading the belleville-spring by going back to the earlier design. My OEM late design belleville-spring is notably thinner than the earlier design. It's my understanding that the thicker, earlier design hold up better to applications running higher operating pressures.

Image



The hardware that holds the belleville-spring in place amounts to a steel spacer (my OEM spacer is plastic) and a thin wavy retaining ring. The wavy retaining ring allows some cushioning in addition to holding stuff in place.

Image



To start the clutch-pack install, we start with the clutch pressure-plate. Notice it's of a seemingly stepped design. That step is in the shape of a V. Wide at the base and thinner at the peak.

Here's the thing, think of the belleville-spring as a teeter-board on a common seesaw. That step in the clutch pressure-plate can be viewed as the pivot-point of the seesaw.

Image



If we move that seesaw's pivot-point a little more toward the outer diameter of the clutch retainer, we've created a very basic lever.
The apply-piston presses on the long end of the seesaw's teeter-board. The short end of the teeter-board rests in a groove, locked in place. As such the piston's movement is multiplied and translated to the clutch-pack's pressure-plate.

Image



We can finally start on the actual rear clutch disc / steel disc stack itself. After soaking the clutch discs in trans fluid, we start with a clutch disc up against the pressure-plate. Then we alternate with a steel disc. Back and forth till we've got four clutch discs stacked in front of the pressure-plate.

Image


Now, install the reaction-plate and lock it all in with a flat retainer ring.
To complete the clutch assembly, we need to dial in the clearance in the clutch stack. Such can be done a number of ways to accomplish the goal even though a given application may use a different count of clutch discs and steels. There are different clutch disc and steel disc thicknesses to select from. There are varying thickness reaction-plates available. I even have a modified pressure-plate that's 0.050" shorter than my OEM one.

Image



To use the clutch discs that came with my build-kit, I had to move/swap some of the components around. To start with, I prefer to run the thickest pressure and reaction plates possible so as to reduce the chance of the plates flexing and allowing inconsistent apply pressure on the clutch/steels.
The clutch retainer can be had in a number of styles that basically set it up for a specific count of clutch discs. Naturally, my OEM 46RH clutch retainer can't, by design, hold the clutch/steel count I'm after.
I've got a decent selection of different thickness reaction-plates as well as a pretty good selection of retaining rings to work with, so . . .

I selected/moved stuff till I got the rear (forward) clutch-pack set with a clearance of 0.025". (The 48RE spec is 0.025 ~ 0.045". This particular application of the thicker belleville-spring is looking for 0.020 ~ 0.036"). Getting too tight can result in the forward clutch dragging when released, while in reverse gear. As the forward clutch is engaged when going forward, it gets little wear compared to the other clutches of the transmission.

Image

Image



That's it for tonight. Monday will be on us shortly, if we're lucky. ;)
David

1993 12mm VE Fueled W250 CC, Green
12.67 @ 103.35
Your basic farm truck ;)
BC847
Administrator
 
Posts: 2033
Joined: Wed Jan 03, 2007 5:22 pm

Re: Just a little more . . . . .

Postby BC847 » Mon Nov 04, 2019 9:17 pm

Good evening bitches!

Got a little more done tonight.

Remember earlier, I'd flat forgotten about the rear-band change, never mind I new nothing of the servo size change.

Well, once again the good folks at Suncoast saved my hiney. I needed a rear band servo BUT! I also need all the other components to complete the install in a 47RH case.

Image



Wet everything with trans fluid and slip that boy in there.

Image



Installing the rear-band servo lever completes that section.

Image



Then, I moved on to the front (direct) clutch.
To start with, I got an upgraded front clutch apply-piston. Instead of a thinner casting, this one started life as a aluminum billet that was milled such that the finished product is notably more ridged so as to lessen any possible flexing during use with higher hydraulic pressures. The design also eliminates a lot of hollow space in the piston so there's less fluid in the thing that, at high rpm, can present with enough pressure to move the piston when you don't want it to move.

Image



OK, with new seals installed, slather that expected and install the piston in the front clutch housing with a twisting motion (albeit greatly limited) so as to help ensure the seal's lips don't invert.

Image



Now place the included springs in the milled-in pockets of the apply-piston.

Image



OK, without putting an eye out, place the piston return spring retainer over the springs. Then safely compress the thing enough to slip the piston spring retainer snap ring in place.

Image



Here again, to install the clutch/steel stack, start with a steel disc against the apply-piston. Follow that with a clutch disc, and so on. In this case, I got six clutch discs in ending with the front clutch backing plate. As with the forward clutch, one can swap around different thickness clutch discs and steels as well as the backing-plate and front backing-plate snap-ring.
The clearance for this mess is 0.090".

Image



That's it for tonight. Got ice machine training in the morning.
David

1993 12mm VE Fueled W250 CC, Green
12.67 @ 103.35
Your basic farm truck ;)
BC847
Administrator
 
Posts: 2033
Joined: Wed Jan 03, 2007 5:22 pm
Top

Re: Just a little more . . . . .

Postby BC847 » Tue Nov 05, 2019 8:15 pm

After consulting a professional trans shop, I spent this evening fine-tuning the clutch pack clearances as well as addressing a looser-fitting than design shell sun-gear. :|
David

1993 12mm VE Fueled W250 CC, Green
12.67 @ 103.35
Your basic farm truck ;)
BC847
Administrator
 
Posts: 2033
Joined: Wed Jan 03, 2007 5:22 pm
Top

Re: Just a little more . . . . .

Postby BC847 » Thu Nov 07, 2019 8:10 pm

Took Wednesday night off.
Thursday night saw me pressure-wash the drive-shafts, the trans support cross-member and mounting adapter. The skid-plate and transfer-case shifter. Then under the truck including the exposed ass of the engine.
David

1993 12mm VE Fueled W250 CC, Green
12.67 @ 103.35
Your basic farm truck ;)
BC847
Administrator
 
Posts: 2033
Joined: Wed Jan 03, 2007 5:22 pm
Top

Re: Just a little more . . . . .

Postby BC847 » Sat Nov 09, 2019 5:13 pm

Back when I swapped to a bunch of 48RE rotating parts, I got the 48RE 3-speed section's sun-gear. I kept the associated 46RH drive-shell.

It never occurred to me that since that 48 drive-shell got a little thicker than that of the 46, that there'd be an associated alteration of the related sun-gear to accommodate such. DERP!

That was pointed out to me recently and checking things found my current setup loose. :roll:

Anyhoo, I got that thicker drive-shell today and rebuilt the planetary gear-train so it'd be in the end-play range of 0.006" ~ 0.048" (0.022").
Slipped a temporary 0.060" selectable thrust-washer in the input-shaft's socket and stacked all the mess in the 3-speed case.

Image



It's starting to get crowded in there.

Image



From there, I moved on to the pump body/stator assembly.
My original 46RH to the left and, the "reconditioned" 48RE to the right.

Image



The pump from the 46:

Image



And that from a 48RE:

Image



Hmmmmm. See the difference? I wonder which is more desirable and why.
David

1993 12mm VE Fueled W250 CC, Green
12.67 @ 103.35
Your basic farm truck ;)
BC847
Administrator
 
Posts: 2033
Joined: Wed Jan 03, 2007 5:22 pm
Top

Re: Just a little more . . . . .

Postby BC847 » Mon Nov 11, 2019 6:35 pm

Got the driveshafts disassembled and ready to go to the shop.
David

1993 12mm VE Fueled W250 CC, Green
12.67 @ 103.35
Your basic farm truck ;)
BC847
Administrator
 
Posts: 2033
Joined: Wed Jan 03, 2007 5:22 pm
Top

Re: Just a little more . . . . .

Postby BC847 » Mon Nov 11, 2019 7:10 pm

Converting your mess to lock-up moves the transmission back 1 1/8" (1.125")

NO more, no less.

Image
David

1993 12mm VE Fueled W250 CC, Green
12.67 @ 103.35
Your basic farm truck ;)
BC847
Administrator
 
Posts: 2033
Joined: Wed Jan 03, 2007 5:22 pm
Top

Re: Just a little more . . . . .

Postby BC847 » Wed Nov 13, 2019 7:02 pm

Delivered the driveshafts to the shop.
The front shaft's telescoping joint was worn weird so, gotta replace that. Otherwise, rebuild the OEM CV joint, new universal joint on the axle-end. Lengthen it 1.125" and balance.
The rear shaft will be shortened by 1.125", new carrier-bearing, universal-joints and balance.

Geeez! Kinda hurt my feelings.

It turns out the trans fluid pump from the 48RE is, in addition to the larger lobes, is larger in overall diameter. The guy telling it said it might be around a 10% increase in volume.

OK.

I got the so called rebuilt. . . . whatever 48RE stator support from the same place I got the 47RH valve-body from. One of the pump-cover's hydraulic fluid passages has crap in it that I can scrape loose with a pick. I've got it soaking in some stiff metal-safe cleaner. I'll get the pressure-washer after it tomorrow.

With that I got moving to the next stage of setting the overall end-play.

Image



There's a couple of places to work with.

Image



Keep moving forward . . . . .
David

1993 12mm VE Fueled W250 CC, Green
12.67 @ 103.35
Your basic farm truck ;)
BC847
Administrator
 
Posts: 2033
Joined: Wed Jan 03, 2007 5:22 pm
Top

Previous

Return to The good stuff

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

cron